New York City has been in a constant state of construction since the very beginning. Throughout its history, the city has evolved into an architectural destination. With the 400th anniversary of the city’s founding right around the corner, it’s the perfect time to explore the buildings that make up the Big Apple’s iconic skyline.

Historical Buildings in New York

The structure of the city has changed a lot in the process of development, but some of the architectural valuables are still preserved. These buildings reflect the historic values of New York. Some of the most important buildings that describe the history of this amazing city are as follows provided by stjames-maps.net:

List of Historic Iconic Landmarks in New York City

List of Historic Iconic Landmarks in New York City

  • Brooklyn Bridge

In 1883, thousands of New Yorkers showed up to the opening ceremony of the Brooklyn Bridge. After 13 years of construction, locals were still concerned over its safety, and to prove its strength, authorities invited a circus entertainer to walk 21 elephants over the bridge. The 1,595-foot-long structure was the world’s longest suspension bridge until 1903, when the nearby Williamsburg Bridge overtook it by 4.5 feet.

  • Trinity Church

The first Trinity Church was built on land designated in a charter by King William III in 1697, and it was destroyed in a fire in 1776. The second Trinity Church was opened in 1790, and it was torn down in 1839 after damage from severe snow. The third Trinity Church, which still stands today, opened in 1846 and was designed by Richard Upjohn with extravagant Gothic architecture. The church holds 23 bells, three sets of extravagant bronze doors, and a number of sculptures. In 1976, Trinity Church became a National Historic Landmark.

  • The Oculus

In the nearly two decades since terrorists attacked New York City’s World Trade Center, architects from all over the world have worked hard to rebuild what was lost. Rather than replicate what once existed, many of these creative thinkers have opted to develop new designs that respectfully pay tribute to the previous buildings—and, most importantly, to those who lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks.

Designed by famed Spanish architect and structure engineer Santiago Calatrava, this luminous space is intended to resemble “a bird flying from the hands of a child,” bringing a sense of hope to a site of tragedy.

  • Statue of Liberty

A massive copper-and-steel cast of a green lady raising a torch, clutching a tablet and donning a seven-point crown. The monument welcomed generations of immigrants to the United States as they passed through Ellis Island, the nation’s main entry station between 1892 and 1924 (it eventually closed in 1954).

  • The Dakota

Construction of the Dakota was completed in 1884, and luxury apartments became available in the Upper West Side. The building was named ‘The Dakota’ because not many people lived in the area, thus playing on the small population of the Dakotas. It is an architectural beauty, with gables and strong French and German influences. It became a National Historic Landmark in 1976.